Andy Vaughn

Blog

The Evolution of a professional web developer

Today, I reflected on websites I’ve built in the past and the tools I’ve come to deem essential along the way. Essentially, my evolution as a professional web developer. When you first start a vocation, highlighting your strengths is the most pressing need. It’s difficult to stand apart from the crowd, differentiate yourself, and often […]

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Call to Engage

Most websites are designed to direct you towards a “call to action.” This may be a call to purchase, contact, subscribe, tweet, or download. “Click here” and your wildest fantasies will come true… This is a very important component to brick and mortar businesses on the Web that need to quantitatively measure the number of […]

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Smell the Roses

“Stop and Smell the Roses” …is a famous saying to people who are constantly rushing from here to there, without any enjoyment of the process, no time to reflect on life. In recent history, this statement had validity. People were goal-driven, results-oriented, and didn’t pay attention to anything but the bottom line. Then came the […]

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PHP Copyright

There’s little that annoys me as much as going to a website that is an authority on some subject, and it has an outdated copyright. Here’s a very simple script to replace all of your copyrights, so that they are constantly updated with the latest year. <p>Copyright 2007-<?php echo(date(‘Y’));?>.</p> This is, of course, assuming that […]

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How to find out if it’s just You

Yesterday, I met with a client who had a drop in contact requests for his product over the last month. We took a look at the website analytics, compared conversions, and indeed his numbers were down from the same month last year. We could assume economic shifts, weather changes, or voodoo curses may have caused […]

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How to write CSS for a CMS

When writing CSS, it’s very important to pay attention to the “cascading” factor in your stylesheets, as opposed to simply adding style on top of style. When writing CSS for a content management system, it is vital to harness the strength of the cascade, and not repeat yourself. I’m going to show you how I […]

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Museo Sans 500

Today I switched my body font from Qlassik to Museo Sans 500. I also replaced the italic styles to Museo Sans 500 Italic. It’s a great-looking sans-serif font created by Jos Buivenga based on the Museo font. I downloaded the fonts from MyFonts and created the @font-face stack through FontSquirrel. Let me know what you […]

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Chess Puzzles

Chess Puzzles is a website that I designed and strategically programmed for John Bain two and a half years ago. It’s still going strong, with over ten-thousand visitors monthly playing and participating in the daily puzzles. The website was built using WordPress as a CMS, and the chess tactic engine was programmed using a custom […]

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Single-line CSS

This is somewhat of a personal post. “Personal” in the sense that the information is very subjective and not objective. However, I will try and persuade you of my opinion. “CSS declarations should be written on a single line.” — me p {font-size: 1.8em; line-height: 1.5; color: #000; margin: 0 0 1.5em;} …as opposed to: […]

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Git Started

Using a version control system is helpful for multiple developer environments, as well as individual tracking and archiving of changes. Here’s how I set mine up using Git. Note: Setting up a cloned repository between dev and live servers is useful for theme and static file tracking. You wouldn’t want to setup Git on an […]

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